Difference between revisions of "Herb Green"

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(Created page with "''Dr 'George Herbert "Herb" Green''' '''George Herbert "Herb" Green''' (1916–2001) was the doctor at the centre of the Cartwright Inquiry, a commission set up to exami...")
 
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''Dr 'George Herbert "Herb" Green'''
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''Dr George Herbert "Herb" Green
  
'''George Herbert "Herb" Green''' (1916&ndash;2001) was the doctor at the centre of the [[Cartwright Inquiry]], a commission set up to examine claims that he had been illegally experimenting on patients without their consent between 1966 and 1987. The inquiry found that he had conducted a study between 1966 and 1987 in which the cases of women with major cervical abnormalities were followed without definitive treatment, in an attempt to prove his "personal belief" that these abnormalities were "not a forerunner of invasive cancer."<ref>http://www.womens-health.org.nz/index.php?page=summary-of-findings-and-recommendations-from-cartwright-report Cartwright Inquiry - Summary of findings and recommendations</ref>
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'''George Herbert "Herb" Green''' (1916&ndash;2001) was the doctor at the centre of the [[Cartwright Inquiry]], a commission set up to examine claims that he had been illegally experimenting on patients without their consent between 1966 and 1987. The inquiry found that he had conducted a study between 1966 and 1987 in which the cases of women with major cervical abnormalities were followed without definitive treatment, in an attempt to prove his "personal belief" that these abnormalities were "not a forerunner of invasive cancer."<ref>[http://www.womens-health.org.nz/index.php?page=summary-of-findings-and-recommendations-from-cartwright-report Cartwright Inquiry - Summary of findings and recommendations']</ref>
 
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After Green retired, a paper<ref>{{cite journal| last=McIndoe| first=William A. |coauthors=McLean, M.R., Jones, R.W., Mullins, P.R. |title=The invasive potential of carcinoma in situ of the cervix |journal=Obstetric Gynecology |year=1984 |volume=64 |pages=451–458}}</ref> was published in 1984 discussing the outcome of Green's management of his patients. This paper came to the attention of Phillida Bunkle and Sandra Coney, who published an article entitled "An Unfortunate Experiment" in ''Metro Magazine'' in June 1987.<ref name="Heslop">{{cite journal|url=http://www.nzma.org.nz/journal/117-1199/1000/|title=‘All about research’—looking back at the 1987 Cervical Cancer Inquiry|last=Heslop|first=Barbara|journal=New Zealand Medical Journal|date=6 August 2004|volume=117|issue=1199}}</ref> (The full phrase "an unfortunate experiment at National Women's Hospital" first appeared the year before in the ''New Zealand Medical Journal'', in a letter from Professor David Skegg.<ref name="JonesFitzgerald">
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{{cite journal| last=Jones| first=Ronald |coauthors=Fitzgerald, Norman |title=The development of cervical cytology and colposcopy in New Zealand: 50 years since the first cytology screening laboratory at National Women’s Hospital |journal=New Zealand Medical Journal |date=26 November 2004 |volume=117 |issue=1206}}</ref>) The main media then used the term "unfortunate experiment" extensively.
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A 2010 study comparing patients diagnosed with cervical carcinoma ''in situ'' during Green's study period with those diagnosed beforehand and afterwards found that his patients were at substantially greater risk of cancer and were subjected to numerous extra tests that were intended to observe rather than treat their conditions. It concluded that eight women died as a result.<ref>[http://tvnz.co.nz/health-news/unfortunate-experiment-led-eight-deaths-3577366 "Unfortunate experiment" led to eight deaths], ''ONE News'', 2 June 2010.</ref><ref>{{cite journal
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  |author = McCredie, Margaret R.E.
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  |coauthors = Paul, Charlotte; Sharples, Katrina J.; Baranyai, Judith; Medley, Gabriele; Skegg, David C.G.; and Jones, Ronald W.
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  |title = Consequences in women of participating in a study of the natural history of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3
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  |journal = Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
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  |year = 2010
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  |volume = 50
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  |pmid = 20716265
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  |doi = 10.1111/j.1479-828X.2010.01170.x
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  |issue = 4
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  |pages = no
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}}</ref>
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Green graduated from Otago Medical School in 1945 and retired in the early 1980s, before the publication of the article in ''Metro''. His specialities were [[gynaecology]] and [[obstetrics]] and he wrote a textbook on the subject that underwent several revisions.
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He was born in Balclutha on 16 November 1916 and died in St John's Hospital, Auckland on 4 March 2001.<ref name="obit"/><ref>''New Zealand Herald'' 2001; Death Notice 6 March page C14 & Obituary 8 March page A3</ref><ref>{{cite news|url=http://tvnz.co.nz/view/page/425826/32216|title='Unfortunate experiment' doctor dies|publisher=[[Television New Zealand]]|date=8 March 2001}}</ref>
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After Green retired, a paper<ref>McIndoe, William A.; McLean, M.R., Jones, R.W., Mullins, P.R. (1984). "The invasive potential of carcinoma in situ of the cervix". Obstetric Gynecology 64: 451–458.</ref> was published in 1984 discussing the outcome of Green's management of his patients. This paper came to the attention of Phillida Bunkle and Sandra Coney, who published an article entitled "An Unfortunate Experiment" in ''Metro Magazine'' in June 1987.<ref>[http://www.nzma.org.nz/journal/117-1199/1000/ ‘All about research’—looking back at the 1987 Cervical Cancer Inquiry]</ref> (The full phrase "an unfortunate experiment at National Women's Hospital" first appeared the year before in the ''New Zealand Medical Journal'', in a letter from Professor David Skegg.<ref>Jones, Ronald; Fitzgerald, Norman (26 November 2004). "The development of cervical cytology and colposcopy in New Zealand: 50 years since the first cytology screening laboratory at National Women’s Hospital". New Zealand Medical Journal 117 (1206).</ref>) The main media then used the term "unfortunate experiment" extensively.
  
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A 2010 study comparing patients diagnosed with cervical carcinoma ''in situ'' during Green's study period with those diagnosed beforehand and afterwards found that his patients were at substantially greater risk of cancer and were subjected to numerous extra tests that were intended to observe rather than treat their conditions. It concluded that eight women died as a result.<ref>[http://tvnz.co.nz/health-news/unfortunate-experiment-led-eight-deaths-3577366 "Unfortunate experiment" led to eight deaths], ''ONE News'', 2 June 2010.</ref>
  
 
==Abortionist==
 
==Abortionist==

Revision as of 10:57, 4 April 2011

Dr George Herbert "Herb" Green

George Herbert "Herb" Green (1916–2001) was the doctor at the centre of the Cartwright Inquiry, a commission set up to examine claims that he had been illegally experimenting on patients without their consent between 1966 and 1987. The inquiry found that he had conducted a study between 1966 and 1987 in which the cases of women with major cervical abnormalities were followed without definitive treatment, in an attempt to prove his "personal belief" that these abnormalities were "not a forerunner of invasive cancer."[1]

After Green retired, a paper[2] was published in 1984 discussing the outcome of Green's management of his patients. This paper came to the attention of Phillida Bunkle and Sandra Coney, who published an article entitled "An Unfortunate Experiment" in Metro Magazine in June 1987.[3] (The full phrase "an unfortunate experiment at National Women's Hospital" first appeared the year before in the New Zealand Medical Journal, in a letter from Professor David Skegg.[4]) The main media then used the term "unfortunate experiment" extensively.

A 2010 study comparing patients diagnosed with cervical carcinoma in situ during Green's study period with those diagnosed beforehand and afterwards found that his patients were at substantially greater risk of cancer and were subjected to numerous extra tests that were intended to observe rather than treat their conditions. It concluded that eight women died as a result.[5]

Abortionist

Various individuals in the industry have confirmed that Green also operated as an abortionist at the Auckland Medical Aid Centre.

References

  1. Cartwright Inquiry - Summary of findings and recommendations'
  2. McIndoe, William A.; McLean, M.R., Jones, R.W., Mullins, P.R. (1984). "The invasive potential of carcinoma in situ of the cervix". Obstetric Gynecology 64: 451–458.
  3. ‘All about research’—looking back at the 1987 Cervical Cancer Inquiry
  4. Jones, Ronald; Fitzgerald, Norman (26 November 2004). "The development of cervical cytology and colposcopy in New Zealand: 50 years since the first cytology screening laboratory at National Women’s Hospital". New Zealand Medical Journal 117 (1206).
  5. "Unfortunate experiment" led to eight deaths, ONE News, 2 June 2010.